Sub-Saharan African Journal of Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 132--136

Prevalence of sickle cell disease among pregnant women in a tertiary health center in south-south Nigeria


Ogbonna Collins Nwabuko1, Dorathy Adaunwa Okoh3, Caroline Iyalla2, Hannah Omunakwe4 
1 Department of Hematology, Abia State University, Uturu, Abia State; Department of Pathology, Braithwaite Memorial Specialist Hospital, Port Harcourt, Nigeria
2 Department of Hematology, Blood Transfusion and Immunology, University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Ogbonna Collins Nwabuko
Department of Hematology, Abia state University, Uturu, Abia State
Nigeria

Background: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is relatively prevalent in Nigeria and it is associated with obstetric complications, especially in unsupervised pregnancies. This study was to determine the prevalence of SCD among pregnant women seen in an antenatal clinic in a tertiary health center in South-South Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This was a 10-year retrospective study of all registered pregnant women seen at the antenatal clinic of Braithwaite Memorial Specialist Hospital (BMSH) (2004-2013). Sociodemographic data and hemoglobin (Hb) electrophoresis were obtained using questionnaires and alkaline cellulose acetate electrophoretic machines (Helena), respectively. Data were analyzed using Epi-info version 7.02 by the WHO, Geneva, Switzerland, and CDC, USA. Results: A total of 35,976 pregnant women were seen at the antenatal clinic of BMSH within the study period, out of which 28,815 (80.09%) were Hb AA, 7,109 (19.77%) were Hb AS, and 52 (0.14%) were SS. The average gestational age of booking was 22.1 weeks. More women with tertiary education registered earlier than those with secondary education. Anemia in pregnancy (Hb <11 g/dl) was found in 94.2% of the pregnant women with Hb SS, while 5.8% was above 11 g/dl (P = 0.001). Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of SCD among pregnant women in this region. Late antenatal booking, anemia, and poor education are the predictive markers of poor pregnancy outcome in this region.


How to cite this article:
Nwabuko OC, Okoh DA, Iyalla C, Omunakwe H. Prevalence of sickle cell disease among pregnant women in a tertiary health center in south-south Nigeria.Sub-Saharan Afr J Med 2016;3:132-136


How to cite this URL:
Nwabuko OC, Okoh DA, Iyalla C, Omunakwe H. Prevalence of sickle cell disease among pregnant women in a tertiary health center in south-south Nigeria. Sub-Saharan Afr J Med [serial online] 2016 [cited 2020 Nov 26 ];3:132-136
Available from: https://www.ssajm.org/article.asp?issn=2384-5147;year=2016;volume=3;issue=3;spage=132;epage=136;aulast=Nwabuko;type=0