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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 65-70

Reproducibility of hematological parameters: Manual versus automated method


1 Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria
2 Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Aliyu A Babadoko
Department of Haematology and Blood Transfusion, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria
Nigeria
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DOI: 10.4103/2384-5147.184352

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Background: The automated hematology analyzer has replaced the traditional manual assay methods and eye count for determination of hematological parameters. Recently, they are widely used in laboratories and hospitals for counting of blood cells necessary for diagnosis and monitoring treatment of various disorders. Objective: To compare the blood count results of automated hematology analyzer with the traditional manual method in the determination of some hematological parameters. Methodology: A total of 100 samples were randomly selected from samples received at the reception of hematology laboratory in June 2014. The anticoagulated blood was collected and subjected to analysis of hematological parameters by automated hematology analyzer (Swelab Alfa) and standard manual methods. Results: The mean hematocrit, total white cell and platelets count, neutrophils, and lymphocytes percentages by manual method were 37.5 ± 7.2%, 7.2 ± 3.7 × 10 9 /L, 244.8 ± 171.8 × 10 9 /L, 53.8 ± 16.0%, and 41.8 ± 28.2%, respectively while that by automation were 37.2 ± 7.3%, 7.9 ± 6.1 × 10 9 /L, 278.1 ± 162.0 × 10 9 /L, 52.6 ± 16.0%, and 41.0 ± 14.3%, respectively. Whereas the mean platelets count was significantly (P < 0.05) higher in the automated method, there was no significant statistical difference between the mean hematocrit, total white cell and platelets count, neutrophils, and lymphocytes percentages of all the study samples (P > 0.05) and this remained so in male gender. The Pearson correlation test showed a positive significant (P < 0.05) correlation between both methods even after gender stratification. Conclusion: Automated analyzers can be used in all laboratories to provide quick and accurate results for patient care. However, it should be accompanied by microscopic blood film examination to provide confirmatory and additional useful diagnostic information.


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