• Users Online: 1210
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 74-78

Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in Cervical Spondylosis and Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy in Zaria, Northern Nigeria


1 Department of Radiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria
2 Department of Radiology, National Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sefiya Adebanke Olarinoye-Akorede
Department of Radiology, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id


DOI: 10.4103/2384-5147.157424

Rights and Permissions

Background: Cervical spondylosis (CS) has received little attention in the Nigerian medical literature even in the present era of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unfortunately, cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is the most common form of functional debility from spinal cord disease in older adults. Objective: We sought to describe the clinico radiologic findings in CS and CSM with the hope of familiarizing clinicians with this prevalent and potentially devastating disorder. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective analysis of 76 patients who underwent cervical MRI examination on account of CS, associated with either radiculopathy, myelopathy, or myelo radiculopathy. The patients comprised of 54 (71.1%) males and 22 (28.9%) females, their ages ranged from 26 to 78 years. Each patient was also scored clinically using the Nurick's classification for cervical myelopathy and scores compared with their MRI examination findings. Results: The condition was commoner in males than females (M:F = 2.5:1). Multi-level disease was seen in almost all patients and the commonest disc levels affected in spondylosis were C4/5, followed by C5/6; while for spondylotic myelopathy, it was C3-4 level. The prevalence of CSM in this study was 42.10%. The patients' clinical scores compared well with their MRI findings. Conclusion: CS should not be dismissed as a mere consequence of aging 'but a disease with possible debilitating outcome and early prevalence due to an interplay of environmental and genetic factors'. On the strength of this, we have presented the MRI and clinical findings in CS and spondylotic myelopathy; and also reviewed previous reports in the light of the current findings in the literature.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed5672    
    Printed90    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded342    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal